Sunday, June 14, 2009

20th Annual Tribute to the Ancestors of the Middle Passage, 2009

Here are some images from the annual Tribute to the Ancestors of the Middle Passage, an annual event that takes place on the second Saturday in June in Coney Island, Brooklyn. Similar ceremonies take place around the globe from Africa to Brazil to South Carolina. The annual tribute is in remembrance of the tens of millions of Africans who, after being kidnapped from their homeland, died during the voyage across the Atlantic – the Middle Passage – and their bodies were plunged into the Atlantic Ocean, which was to become the largest African burial ground in the world.

The ceremonies involve singing, dancing, prayer, worship, and drumming all day long. At sunset, a procession moves to the ocean where offerings of flowers, rhum, honey, and fruit are made.

It was a rainy, densely overcast day this year which made photographing a challenge, but that did not stop worshipers including myself from gathering to pay tribute to the ancestors of the Middle Passage. It tuns out the rain was not rain at all, but an anointing and blessing from the heavens---or so the faithful believe.

Click on any image to enlarge and feel free to post comments or reflections! Enjoy!




































































Where ocean meets sky.


Dedicated to memory of Bill Harmon, Larry Knight and Neal Collins...all whom are now ancestors and watch over me.

5 comments:

EpiphanyNoir said...

Love the black and white! Do you shoot that way or convert it in photoshop!

Ocean Morisset said...

Hey thanks for the props Chris! These were shot in b/w on a very overcast day.

ROD (aka BIG ROD) said...

Ocean, you da man bro! I have a link to these pics fro the ADODI New York Habari Gani e-Newsletter (July 2009)

Grinder said...

These are a great set of photos. Thanks for this.

Anonymous said...

I love this tribute, just looking at the pictures made me want to cry. I am a mother of four boys with a strong spirtual connection with the history of our people. I believe every child should know who they truely are and how important his or her destiny is to ensure a better and promising future.